Barefoot, uphill both ways

A couple of weeks ago, my four year old stepped on my foot accidentally and it hurt.  Badly.  Mainly because he’d stepped on my little toe that I’d broken last year that still bothers me. But by the next morning, I was limping because it hurt so badly on the side of my foot.   Being a diabetic, I don’t mess around with my feet because you can have so many problems, so I made an appt with a Podiatrist.

Good news is, my feet showed no signs at all of any neuropathy. Woot woot.  In fact, you wouldn’t even know they were the feet of someone who had been diabetic for almost 20 years.

Bad news is I had a severe case of tendonitis on my right foot (at least it wasn’t broken, though!)  I have a half dollar sized puffy spot on the side of my foot so she gave me an Rx for an anti-inflammatory (PSA: She said not to take Aleve because it has so much sodium in it, that it’s bad for someone with hypertension .. did not know that) and then the nurse walks in with a boot.  One of those big black velcro boots that goes up to your knee.    Why?? I didn’t break anything. It’s only a little tender when I turn my foot a certain way. So my solution – I won’t turn it that way.

Dr says wear this boot for 2 weeks, then come back for a follow up.   So I did.  Well, almost. I wore it for a few days shy of the 2 weeks.  Went back in and got “the look” when she asked me why I wasn’t wearing the boot.  (Silly me, I had sat it out that morning to wear to the appt at least, but forgot it.)

She said I don’t have to wear the boot anymore, but I do have to wear an ankle support brace that is much more low profile.  Every day. All day. For 2-3 months.  What???  My ankle isn’t the problem.  But I guess where the tendon is, it can weaken the ankle, so if you don’t support it properly, it can snap on you when you’re doing something as simple as stepping off of a curb.  Ok, fine. I’ll wear the brace.  Then in 2-3 weeks I’m supposed to start doing some stretching exercises with a band.  Hope I remember. 

Then she asked me what I wear on my feet when I’m at home, or out and about.  I said when I’m at home, I am usually barefoot (or in socks), or I wear slippers.  When I’m out, it depends on where I’m going. She shook her head and I doubt she actually did it, but I swear I heard a “tsk tsk”.   She asked me how old I was.  I told her 37 (I’m not ashamed 😉 ) and she told me I should never walk around barefoot.  That when you get “older” there are some things you just can’t get away with any more, and the fact that I’m diabetic means I should never walk barefoot.

Hold the presses.  As she’s saying this, I could feel myself turning into a defiant child that wants to shout out “I can walk barefoot if I want to!”  But I didn’t.  Not out loud anyway. Yes, I do know that diabetes commonly causes neuropathy in feet and you can’t always feel things when you step on them, which can cause infections, which can ultimately cause amputations. Only in extreme cases.  But my feet are fine. So far.

So apparently because of my “old age” and my diabetes, I shouldn’t walk barefoot any more.  Sorry, but that’s not going to happen.  I don’t walk barefoot outside – I never have.  Not for any reason other than I just don’t like to …       But I don’t want to walk around my house in tennis shoes.  Or she recommended these other granny-looking support shoes that I should wear indoors all.the.time.  So again, with my defiant childish self, I smiled and told her I’d look into the shoes, and in my mind I was saying, “Nuh-uh. Ain’t happenin’.”

I say all of this with no offense to the dr … she was very nice and is just being overly cautious.  But I’m not someone who wants to act “old” or “disabled”.  I think if you treat yourself like you’re old, then you will ultimately start to feel old.  So for the time being, I’ll be walking around my house in socks or barefoot and probably sporting my new stylish ankle support brace for the next couple of months at least. 😉

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About Shannon

I am a wife, a mommy, and a Type 1 diabetic (since '92.) I have had two successful pregnancies - one of which was with twins. I wear an insulin pump- - off and on for 17 years; currently on the Medtronic pump and CGM. I am not a medical professional, nor am I giving medical advice. I am just sharing my day to day stories of someone who lives with this disease every day. My ultimate goal is to raise awareness.
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3 Responses to Barefoot, uphill both ways

  1. Scott E says:

    Sometimes I feel like certain doctors give directions just so you need a return visit and they can keep a steady, and profitable, flow of patients through their office. I’m 38 years old, have had diabetes for 31 of those 38 years, and have NEVER been to a podiatrist. (Maybe I should?) Occasionally I’ll walk barefoot, like when I run outside to get the morning newspaper from the driveway, but usually not.

    Once as a kid, and begrudgingly complying with my mother’s request, I went out to sweep the garage – I was barefoot. A shovel that my hung on the wall fell down on my foot and created quite a gash. I rinsed off my foot and wrapped it in half a roll of paper-towels to contain the bleeding until getting a ride to the doctor’s office, at which point it was stitched up. The doc gave me a tetanus shot, but never a word about diabetes and extra-special-foot-care).

    • Shannon says:

      Does your Endo look at your feet, Scott? Mine doesn’t. I was just wondering if most do. This was the first time anyone had looked at mine in a very long time, so I’ll admit I was relieved to get the “all good” verdict.

      • Scott E says:

        Yes he does. In fact, all of mine have, I think. It’s nothing detailed, just a glance and then a touch of a wire filament or some other instrument followed by a question about whether I can feel it or not.

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